U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP)

Updates to CBP’s Global Business Identifier Test

On February 12, 2024, CBP announced key updates to the ongoing Global Business Identifier Evaluative Proof of Concept (GBI EPoC). The agency extended the test from February 12, 2024, through February 23, 2027, clarified the purpose and scope of the test, and expanded the test to include more entry types and countries of origin.

GBI EPoC Background

The Automated Commercial Environment (ACE) is the system through which the U.S. Government processes trade-related import and export data. The transition away from paper-based procedures has resulted in faster, more streamlined processes for both the U.S. Government and industry. To continue this progress, CBP began working with the Border Interagency Executive Council (BIEC) and the Commercial Customs Operations Advisory Committee (COAC) starting in 2017, to discuss the continuing viability of the data element known as the manufacturer or shipper identification code (MID).

Although use of the MID has served CBP and the international trade community well in the past, it became apparent that the MID is not always a consistent or unique number. 

CBP thus engaged in regular outreach with stakeholders in the trade community with the goal of establishing a global entity identifier system. As a result of these discussions, CBP developed GBI EPoC, an interagency trade transformation project that aims to test and develop a single entity identifier solution. 

Through the GBI EPoC, CBP aims to develop a systematic, accurate, and efficient method for the U.S. […]

Know Your Supply Chain: Forced Labor 

The production of goods using forced labor remains an issue around the world. U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) has made clear that they will continue to prioritize forced labor enforcement. CBP is the only U.S. government agency, and one of the few in the world, with the legal authority to take action against goods produced with forced labor to prevent entry into domestic commerce. 

What is Forced Labor? 

Forced labor is defined under 19 U.S.C. § 1307 as “all work or service which is exacted from any person under the menace [threat] of any penalty for its non-performance and for which the worker does not offer himself voluntarily.”  Forced Labor is the third most lucrative illicit trade, behind only drugs and weapons, and has an annual trade value of roughly $150 billion 

Right now, over 40 million people around the world are victims of some type of forced labor, including modern slavery, human trafficking, child labor, etc. Section 307 of the Tariff Act of 1930 (19 U.S.C. 1307) prohibits the importation of all goods and merchandise mined, produced, or manufactured wholly or in part in any foreign country by forced labor, convict labor, and/or indentured labor under penal sanctions, including forced child labor. 

CBP is responsible for preventing the entry of products made with forced labor into the U.S. market by investigating and acting upon allegations of […]

Join Diaz Trade Law at Americas Food and Beverage Show!

Americas Food and Beverage Show is one of the largest food and beverage shows with over 5,000 buyers representing Africa, Asia, Australia, the Caribbean, Central America, Europe, Middle East, North America, and South America. The show also has a conference tied to it where leading experts will provide market trends, FDA compliance tips, trends, challenges and opportunities in the food sector, and much more. Diaz Trade Law is excited to announce that our President, Jennifer Diaz, will be a featured speaker discussing “Top 10 Tips When Importing into the U.S. in compliance with CBP and FDA.”The food show and conference are happening September 18th – 20th, 2023 from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. EST and will take place at the Miami Beach Convention Center, 1901 Convention Center Dr., Miami Beach, FL 33139.

Why Attend?

  • Over 600 Exhibitors
  • Food and Beverage Demo Stage
  • 245,000 sq. ft. of exhibition space
  • Buyers from more than 50 countries
  • Annual conference with industry experts including our very own Jen Diaz!

Register as a buyer or attendee HERE!

 

Green Trade Innovation and Incentives Forum RECAP

On July 11, 2023, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) held the Green Trade Innovation and Incentives Forum, the agency’s first conference that covered CBP’s Green Trade Strategy and related sustainable trade issues. The CBP Green Trade Strategy was formulated by the World Customs Organization (WCO) in Brussels in June of 2022 and serves as the agency’s action plan for addressing climate change’s impact on global trade. The Green Trade Strategy seeks to create business incentives that promote green investment and innovation but also includes ramped-up environmental enforcement efforts. The conference participants included multiple senior officials from CBP, and its partner agencies, as well as top executives from leading industry organizations. 

Green Trade Incentives: 

AnnMarie Highsmith, Executive Assistant Commissioner for CBP’s Office of Trade explained that the Green Strategy rests on four pillars: 

  1. Incentivizing Green Trade

  2. Strengthening environmental enforcement posture

  3. Accelerating green innovation

  4. Improving climate resilience and resource efficiency 

The first and third pillars refer to CBP’s efforts to work with its partner government agencies and industry leaders to remove barriers to sustainable trade and to promote green innovation. Multiple industry leaders at the conference proposed ways that CBP could create incentive structures that reduce the carbon footprint of global supply chains and promote green innovation.  

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DHS Adds Ninestar Co. And Xinjiang Zhongtai Chemical Co. to the UFLPA Entity List

Last week, the interagency Forced Labor Enforcement Task Force (FLETF), led by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), added the following two People’s Republic of China (PRC)-based companies to the Uyghur Forced Labor Prevention Act (UFLPA) Entity List: Ninestar Co. and Xinjiang Zhongtai Chemical Co. DHS found that the companies engaged in business practices that target members of persecuted groups, including Uyghur minorities. Goods produced by the companies  will be restricted from entering the United States.

UFLPA Background

On December 23, 2021, President Biden signed into law H.R. 6256, as part of the United States’ commitment and deterrence efforts to secure U.S. supply chains from goods produced by forced labor. The Uyghur Forced Labor Prevention Act  (UFLPA) (H.R. 6256) requires CBP to apply a rebuttable presumption that all imports of goods, wares, articles, and merchandise manufactured wholly or in part from the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous region of the People’s Republic of China, or by entities identified by the U.S. government on the UFLPA Entity List, are presumed to be produced with forced labor and are prohibited from entry into the United States.

This presumption applies to all goods made in, or shipped through, other countries that include parts made in Xinjiang. However, this presumption is rebuttable. To rebut this presumption, the importer of record will need to provide to CBP clear and convincing evidence that the goods were NOT produced using forced labor.

DHS Making Progress, Some Say Not Enough

While the announcement was applauded by some, other groups expressed […]

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