2022: A Year in Review

From all of us at Diaz Trade Law, we are immensely grateful for your support this year. While returning to a new normal post-pandemic, Diaz Trade Law still managed to save our clients MILLIONS of dollars in 2022. It is with great joy that we finish off 2022 filled with numerous achievements and accomplishments we are humbled to share with you. We look forward to assisting you in what we envision will be a better and brighter 2023!

Below we share some of our top 2022 success stories with you.

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Understanding the RPL Export License Exception

U.S. exporters have an important responsibility to adhere to U.S. export control laws, including the Export Administration Regulations (“EAR”). Administered by the U.S. Commerce Department, the EAR is a set of regulations which governs whether U.S. persons may export or transfer goods, software, and technology outside of the United States or to non-U.S. citizens. U.S. exporters have an important responsibility to adhere to the EAR. Violations of the EAR carry hefty civil and criminal penalties. Exporters can pay hundreds of thousands of dollars in penalties, lose export privileges, and even be imprisoned.

Licensing Exception for “Servicing and Replacement of Parts and Equipment” (RPL)

An export license under the EAR is not necessary if the License Exception for “Servicing and Replacement of Parts and Equipment” (“RPL”) applies. License Exception RPL is described under Part 740.10 of the EAR. RPL is known as a transaction-based exception because the availability/applicability of the exception is based on the terms of the transaction.

According to BIS guidance, the RPL License Exception may be used for the two following scenarios:

  • Replacement Parts – This authorizes the export and reexport of replacement parts for the immediate repair of previously exported, reexported or foreign made equipment incorporating U.S. origin parts on a one-for-one replacement basis. It also authorizes the export and reexport of stock spare parts that were authorized to accompany the export of equipment.
  • Servicing and Replacement – Replacements for defective or unacceptable U.S.-origin equipment. (a) The commodity or software to be replaced must have been […]

Encryption Controls under the Export Administration Regulations

Encryption is generally defined as the process of converting information or data into a code, especially to prevent unauthorized access. Put simply, encryption makes a wide range of technologies more secure. Since 1996, most encrypted technology is controlled by the EAR. Some encrypted technology, which has military-related functionalities, is controlled by the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (“ITAR”). This article provides an overview of encryption controls under the EAR, outlines license exceptions for certain encrypted technologies, and provides best practices for export compliance.

Background on Export Administration Regulations

Over 95% of the world’s population is outside of the United States. Opportunities abound for U.S. companies that export. However, exporting is a privilege and not a right. U.S. exporters have an important responsibility to adhere to U.S. export control laws, including the Export Administration Regulations (“EAR”).

Administered by the U.S. Commerce Department, the EAR is a set of regulations which governs whether U.S. persons may export or transfer goods, software, and technology outside of the United States or to non-U.S. citizens. U.S. exporters have an important responsibility to adhere to the EAR. Violations of the EAR carry hefty civil and criminal penalties. Exporters can pay hundreds of thousands of dollars in penalties, lose export privileges, and even be imprisoned.

Encryption Controls

According to 15 CFR 742.15:

“Encryption items can be used to maintain the secrecy of information, and thereby may be used by persons abroad to harm U.S. national security, foreign policy and law enforcement interests. The United States has a critical interest in ensuring that […]

Successor Liability & Export Control Liability

All too often we hear of companies that do not consider U.S. export controls and trade sanctions in their due diligence checklists when going through an acquisition or merger. When taking over a non-compliant business, the buyer may be responsible for any violations that took place before the acquisition, even if the non-compliant actions were NOT unidentified at the time of the acquisition. In this blog we’ll address export regulations, successor liability, a case study, and practitioner tips on what you should be doing PRIOR to acquiring or merging!

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