Customs Bulletin Weekly, Vol. 56, November 2, 2022, No. 43

Below is a recap for this week’s Custom’s Bulletin.

  • Elimination of Customs Broker District Permit Fee
    • Section 641 of the Tariff Act of 1930, as amended (19 U.S.C. 1641), provides that individuals and business entities must hold a valid customs broker’s license and permit to transact customs business on behalf of others. The statute also sets forth standards for the issuance of broker licenses and permits; provides for disciplinary action against brokers in the form of suspension or revocation of such licenses and permits or assessment of monetary penalties; and, provides for the assessment of monetary penalties against other persons for conducting customs business without the required broker’s license.
    • On June 5, 2020, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) published a notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) in the Federal Register (85 FR 34549), proposing the elimination of customs broker district permit fees in parts 24 and 111.
    • Consistent with the June 5, 2020, notice, CBP is publishing a final rule to, among other things, eliminate customs broker districts (see ‘‘Modernization of the Customs Broker Regulations’’ RIN 1651–AB16). Specifically, CBP is transitioning all brokers to national permits and expanding the scope of the national permit authority to allow national permit holders to conduct any type of customs business throughout the customs territory of the United States. As a result of the elimination of customs broker districts, CBP is amending in this document the regulations to eliminate customs broker district permit fees.
  • Modernization of the Customs Broker Regulations
    • This document adopts […]

Customs and Trade Law Weekly Snapshot

Here is a recap of the latest customs and international trade law news:

[…]

Big News! 352 of 549 Proposed China Tariff Exclusions Reinstated

On March 23, 2022, the U.S. Trade Representative (“USTR”) announced that 352 of the 549 proposed exclusions have been reinstated. The reinstated product exclusions will apply as of October 12, 2021, and extend through December 31, 2022. For a full list of reinstated exclusions, please see this Federal Register announcement.

On October 8, 2021, USTR invited comments on whether to reinstate 549 previously granted and extended exclusions. This recent determination was a result of USTR’s review of public comments regarding whether and which of the proposed exclusions should be reinstated.

Diaz Trade Law filed comments on behalf of several clients who have had their exclusions reinstated. Are your products on the list of exclusions that were reinstated? Do you have questions about navigating Section 301 China tariffs? We are here for you! Diaz Trade Law has significant experience working on Section 301 exclusions. Contact us today at info@diaztradelaw.com.

A list of all the exclusions can be found below:

A. Effective with respect to good entered for consumption, or withdrawn from warehouse for
consumption, on or after 12:01 a.m. eastern daylight time on October 12, 2021, and before
11:59 p.m. eastern daylight time on December 31, 2022, subchapter III of chapter 99 of the
Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States (HTSUS) is modified:
1. by inserting the following new heading 9903.88.67 in numerical sequence, with the
material in the new heading inserted in the columns of the HTSUS labeled
“Heading/Subheading”, “Article Description”, and “Rates of Duty 1-General”,
respectively:
Heading/Subheading: 9903.88.67

Article Description: Effective with respect to entries on or after
October 12, […]

Customs and Trade Law Weekly Snapshot

Here is a recap of the latest customs and international trade law news:

Apparel

  • Nike has ended 2021 as the most valuable apparel firm globally. According to data presented by FinancePR.com, the American outfit achieved a $30.44 billion valuation in 2021, placing it at the helm of the top ten garment firms worldwide.

CBP 

Customs and Trade Law Weekly Snapshot

Here is a recap of the latest customs and international trade law news:

CBP 

  • In Fiscal Year 2021, CBP at the LA/Long Beach Seaport seized More Than $760 Million in Counterfeit and Prohibited Products, a 652% increase over the previous year.
  • CBP issues guidance regarding the extension of product exclusions from additional Section 301 China duties on certain medical-care products to address COVID-19.
  • With changes to the HTSUS classification systems possibly coming as early as January 1, 2021, U.S. importers should review their classifications and ensure compliance with U.S. regulations

BIS

China

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