USDA

Organizations Urge State Department to Stop Avocado Imports Linked to Deforestation

27 organizations wrote a letter to the U.S. State Department urging them to stop imports of avocados linked to deforestation in Mexico. The group alleges that the deforestation is happening illegally and undermines international pledges made by the country to halt these practices.

The groups include the Animal Welfare Institute, the Endangered Species Coalition, and the Oceanic Preservation Society.

According to the letter, an estimated 10 football fields of forest are cleared every day to create avocado plantations in Mexico.

In addition to the deforestation concerns, some of the farming activity is occurring within the Monarch Butterfly Biosphere Reserve. The letter states that as of 2018, nearly 2,400 acres of the Reserve have been converted into avocado plantations.

Finally, the letter notes that the irrigation demand for avocado harvesting depletes water sources for local communities and leaves remaining native forests vulnerable to fire and disease.

Although Mexico is the largest U.S. supplier of avocados, providing almost 90% of the fruit sold in the U.S, the group notes that many Mexican growers have created legal avocado farms that could continue to supply the U.S.

The group requests that the State Department, USDA, and USTR work together to set up a program to ensure that the United States is only importing and marketing avocados that do not contribute to deforestation.

Read the full letter here.

 

By |2024-04-26T07:45:24-04:00April 26, 2024|Import|0 Comments

USDA Proposes New “Made in the USA” Standard

U.S. consumers who seek animal food products labeled as “Made in the USA,” or who simply value transparency on food product labels, may finally catch a break. On March 6, 2023, the USDA released a proposed rule to help define what is meant when a food product is a “Product of USA” or “Made in the USA.”  Currently, Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) regulated products may be labeled as “Product of USA” even when an animal product is derived “from animals that may have been born, raised, and slaughtered in another country but are minimally processed in the United States.”

As a result of the U.S. President’s Action Plan for a Fairer, More Competitive, and More Resilient Meat and Poultry Supply Chain, the proposed rule allows a “Product of USA” or “Made in the USA” label claim to be used on meat, poultry and egg products only when they are derived from animals born, raised, slaughtered and processed in the United States.

Albeit, a very significant caveat accompanies the proposed rule, which is, that, labeling a food product in accordance with the latter is completely voluntary. The U.S. Federal Trade Commission (FTC) takes a similar course of action. While the FTC regulates U.S. origin claims under its authority to act against deceptive acts and practices, foreign-origin markings on products are regulated primarily by U.S. Customs under the Tariff Act of 1930. The similarity in the rules is that neither Customs nor the FTC requires that goods made […]

Customs and Trade Law Weekly Snapshot

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Customs and Trade Law Weekly Snapshot

Here is a recap of the latest customs and international trade law news:

 

 

 

 

[…]

Customs and Trade Law Weekly Snapshot

Here is a recap of the latest customs and international trade law news:

 

 

 

 

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