Export

ICYMI: Commerce, Treasury, and Justice Issue Compliance Note on Obligations of Foreign-Based Persons to Comply with U.S. Export Laws

On March 6, 2024, the Department of Commerce, Department of the Treasury, and Department of Justice issued a tri-seal compliance note titled: “Obligations of foreign-based persons to comply with U.S. sanctions and export control laws.”

The note:

  1. Highlights the applicability of U.S. sanctions and export control laws to persons and entities located abroad;
  2. Outlines the enforcement mechanisms that are available for the U.S. government to hold non-U.S. persons accountable for violations of such laws; and
  3. Provides an overview of compliance considerations for non-U.S. companies and compliance measures to help mitigate their risk

Applicability of U.S. Sanctions and Export Control Laws to Foreign-Based Persons

The U.S. Department of the Treasury’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) administers and enforces economic and trade sanctions, primarily against foreign jurisdictions but also against individuals and entities such as traffickers and terrorists.

The following persons/entities must comply with OFAC regulations:

  • U.S. citizens and permanent resident aliens
  • All persons within the United States
  • All U.S.-incorporated entities and their foreign branches

In certain sanctions programs, foreign entities owned or controlled by U.S. persons also must comply with applicable restrictions – such as engaging in a transaction with the government of Iran. Certain sanctions programs also require foreign persons in possession of U.S.-origin goods to comply.

Non-U.S. persons are also subject to certain OFAC prohibitions. For example, non-U.S. persons are prohibited from causing or conspiring to cause U.S. persons to wittingly or unwittingly violate U.S. sanctions, as well as engaging in conduct that evades U.S. sanctions.

Applicability of U.S. Export Control Laws

The compliance […]

Customs Administrative Enforcement Process: Fines, Penalties, Forfeitures and Liquidated Damages

Diaz Trade Law is enthusiastic to announce Bloomberg Law published another one of our articles! Below is the article reproduced, you can also read here.

All imports and exports are regulated by US Customs and Border Protection (CBP or US Customs; formerly the US Customs Service), which is the largest federal law enforcement agency of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). The history of CBP and the fines, penalties, and forfeitures (FP&F) process goes back to July 4, 1789. The second Act of the First Congress of the United States was to establish a system of tariffs on imported goods to fund the new federal government. Shortly thereafter, Congress established the U.S. Customs Service and subjected merchandise to fines, penalties, and forfeitures for breaches of the law.

The authority to initiate seizures and impose fines was initially vested in Customs field personnel and all fines, penalties, and forfeitures required judicial enforcement. There was no provision allowing the granting of equitable relief. In 1797, the authority to grant equitable relief was vested in the Secretary of Treasury. Over time, as the Secretary’s responsibilities increased, the authority to remit or mitigate penalties was delegated to subordinate officials in the Department and the Customs Service.

In 2003, the US Customs Service was transitioned to CBP, the nation’s first comprehensive border security agency with a focus on maintaining the integrity of the nation’s boundaries and ports of entry. Today, CBP has full authority—pursuant to delegation of authority—to assess penalties and seize merchandise for violations of customs laws. […]

By |2023-11-07T17:44:02-05:00November 6, 2023|Bloomberg, Bloomberg Import|0 Comments

Customs and Trade Law Weekly Snapshot

Here is a recap of the latest customs and international trade law news:

 

 

 

 

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2022: A Year in Review

From all of us at Diaz Trade Law, we are immensely grateful for your support this year. While returning to a new normal post-pandemic, Diaz Trade Law still managed to save our clients MILLIONS of dollars in 2022. It is with great joy that we finish off 2022 filled with numerous achievements and accomplishments we are humbled to share with you. We look forward to assisting you in what we envision will be a better and brighter 2023!

Below we share some of our top 2022 success stories with you.

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Building & Maintaining an Export Compliance Plan

Diaz Trade Law is enthusiastic to announce Bloomberg Law published another one of our articles, “Building & Maintaining an Export Compliance Plan! We also thank our law clerk, Gabi Perez, for her support with research for this article. Below is the article reproduced with permission for your reading pleasure. You can read the article here (where you’ll have the ability to access all of the great hyperlinks). Please note you cannot click on the hyperlinks below.

We’d love to hear your feedback!

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