Exclusions

Big News! 352 of 549 Proposed China Tariff Exclusions Reinstated

On March 23, 2022, the U.S. Trade Representative (“USTR”) announced that 352 of the 549 proposed exclusions have been reinstated. The reinstated product exclusions will apply as of October 12, 2021, and extend through December 31, 2022. For a full list of reinstated exclusions, please see this Federal Register announcement.

On October 8, 2021, USTR invited comments on whether to reinstate 549 previously granted and extended exclusions. This recent determination was a result of USTR’s review of public comments regarding whether and which of the proposed exclusions should be reinstated.

Diaz Trade Law filed comments on behalf of several clients who have had their exclusions reinstated. Are your products on the list of exclusions that were reinstated? Do you have questions about navigating Section 301 China tariffs? We are here for you! Diaz Trade Law has significant experience working on Section 301 exclusions. Contact us today at info@diaztradelaw.com.

A list of all the exclusions can be found below:

A. Effective with respect to good entered for consumption, or withdrawn from warehouse for
consumption, on or after 12:01 a.m. eastern daylight time on October 12, 2021, and before
11:59 p.m. eastern daylight time on December 31, 2022, subchapter III of chapter 99 of the
Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States (HTSUS) is modified:
1. by inserting the following new heading 9903.88.67 in numerical sequence, with the
material in the new heading inserted in the columns of the HTSUS labeled
“Heading/Subheading”, “Article Description”, and “Rates of Duty 1-General”,
respectively:
Heading/Subheading: 9903.88.67

Article Description: Effective with respect to entries on or after
October 12, […]

Potential Relief from China Tariffs Coming

Co-Authored by Sharath Patil

Background on Section 301 Tariffs

A key element of the U.S.-China trade war, initiated under the Trump administration and continuing through Biden’s first term, was the imposition of China tariffs under Section 301. Section 301 is a mechanism via which the President can retaliate against foreign countries that violate U.S. trade agreements or engage in acts that are “unjustifiable” or “unreasonable” and burden U.S. commerce. With regard to China, the U.S. Trade Representative (“USTR”) found that China’s acts, policies, and practices related to intellectual property and innovation are unreasonable or discriminatory and burden or restrict U.S. commerce. Accordingly, a broad set of tariffs were instituted. Section 301 tariffs for goods originating from China have been so expansive that U.S. Customs revenue has nearly doubled from $41.6 billion in FY 2018 to $71.9 billion in FY 2019 and $74.4 billion in FY 2020.

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