Department of Homeland Security

Customs Undervaluation- It’s a Crime

Customs Valuation is a procedure to determine the customs value of imported goods. The customs value is essential to calculate the total duty to be paid on an imported good. As part of its agreement with the World Trade Organization (“WTO”), the U.S. is part of an internationally standardized system of valuing imports. This standardized system allows for CBP to protect revenue, ensure reasonable care from importers, and accurately calculate Census trade statistics. Accordingly, it is critical to declare the value of importations accurately and compliantly. 

The U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) valuation methodology (as well as a summary of relevant Customs rulings) are described in detail in the Valuation Encyclopedia (i.e., the best resource on valuation inquiries). CBP permits merchandise to be valued according to one of the six valuation methods listed below. The methods are applied sequentially from first to last until an applicable value is determined. If the first method does not apply, the importer must then evaluate the second, and so on, until an appropriate method applies. The only exception to this sequential evaluation requirement is when evaluating between deductive value and computed value – an importer may choose to use the computed value before the deductive value.

Methods of Valuation:

  1. The transaction value of imported merchandise (the majority of imports use transaction value – i.e., the price paid or payable plus assists (see below))
  2. The transaction value of identical merchandise
  3. The transaction value of similar merchandise
  4. Deductive value
  5. Computed […]

Air Cargo Advanced Screening

Following September 11, 2001 commercial airlines’ vulnerability and appeal to terrorists became apparent. In 2002 the Department of Homeland Security was established solely to protect Americans from threats like these.

United States Customs and Border Protection (CBP) and the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) cooperate to facilitate safe travel and transportation into the United States. Under the current regulatory framework, TSA has responsibility for ensuring the security of the nation’s transportation of cargo by air into the United States while CBP has responsibility for securing the nation’s borders by preventing high-risk cargo from entering the US. […]

What Keeps You Up at Night – Webinars for Compliance Professionals

fffffWe took a poll to capture ALL of the topics that you wanted to learn about and decided to host 8 webinars for compliance professionals (FREE for clients) with leading experts on topics ranging from Importing 101/201, Exporting 201, to CTPAT, and FDA Compliance and more! Check out our complete list of topics, and click on the topic for more information on the specific learning objectives of each webinar and your expert speakers.

Did I mention that clients of Diaz Trade Law and Diaz Trade Consulting join for FREEPlease email info@diaztradelaw.com for your code!

d43d0e07-8f91-4d0a-b543-70d329a2a6bc

[…]

Go to Top