Commerce Department

BIS Publishes Report on Effect of Uranium Imports on National Security

Background on Section 232 Investigations – Section 232 investigations, administered by the U.S. Commerce Department, are conducted to determine the effect of imports of certain goods on national security Historically, Section 232 investigations have been conducted regarding U.S. imports of crude oil and petroleum products and uranium, among other critical imports.

Investigations may be initiated based on an application from an interested party, a request from the head of any department or agency, or may be self-initiated by the Secretary of Commerce. The Secretary’s report to the President, prepared within 270 days of initiation, focuses on whether the importation of the article in question is in such quantities, or under such circumstances, that threaten to impair the national security. The President can concur or not with the Secretary’s recommendations, and take action to “adjust the imports of an article and its derivatives” or other non-trade related actions as deemed necessary.

To learn more about Section 232 investigations including background on relevant laws and regulations and the history of past cases, check out the Section 232 Program Guide.

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Submitting Voluntary Self-Disclosures to Bureau of Industry & Security

Diaz Trade Law is enthusiastic to announce Bloomberg Law published another one of our articles, “Submitting Voluntary Self-Disclosures to Bureau of Industry & Security”! Below is the article reproduced with permission for your reading pleasure. We’d love to hear your feedback!

You can read the article here (where you’ll have the ability to access all of the great hyperlinks). Please note you cannot click on the hyperlinks below.

We’d love to hear your feedback!

 

 

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New Antidumping Petition Against Imports of Certain Honey Products

Background on AD/CVD Investigations

Antidumping duty (“AD”) and countervailing duty (“CVD”) investigations are brought jointly by the U.S. International Trade Commission (“USITC”) and the U.S. Department of Commerce (“Commerce”). AD investigations are triggered when a domestic industry alleges that it has been injured by competing imports of particular goods from specific countries being sold at less than a fair value. Meanwhile, CVD investigations are triggered when a domestic industry alleges that it has been injured by competing imports that are being unfairly subsidized by their governments. The domestic industry initiating the investigation is known as the petitioner while the foreign industry participating in the investigation is known as the respondent.

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