DIAZ Trade Law

Customs & International Trade Law Expert

Intellectual Property Rights

Diaz Trade Law regularly counsels all sizes of U.S. companies from individuals, small and medium size enterprises, to Fortune 500 companies. Our expertise is in assisting companies in complying with the vast U.S. federal laws and regulations for both import and export transactions as well as supply chain security. We are your “outside, inside counsel”.
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Intellectual Property Rights

 

Diaz Trade Law offers a full range of legal services to meet the needs of creative and inventive clients worldwide. Whether our clients are in need of acquisition, commercialization, or enforcement of intellectual property, Diaz Trade Law serves its clients with substantial experience in protecting and enforcing trademarks, and copyrights, among other intellectual property.

Intellectual property plays an essential role in strengthening the recognition and value of a product and/or service. Our firm provides international intellectual property protection, portfolio management and advice on the commercialization of intellectual property assets. We have the ability to:

  • Prosecute U.S. and foreign trademark applications and internationally,
  • Secure copyright protection and engage in litigation,
  • Defend and prosecute domain name disputes and protection,
  • Offer domestic and international trademark protection,
  • Negotiate IP agreements and secure licensing.

Diaz Trade Law provides innovative and cost-effective solutions to protect our clients’ interest in the domestic and global marketplace. Let us help you achieve success in the marketplace by protecting your intellectual property rights.

 

 

Trademarks

What is a trademark?

A trademark or service mark includes any word, name, symbol, device, or any combination, used or intended to be used to identify and distinguish the goods/services of one seller or provider from those of others, and to indicate the source of the goods/services.

What is a trademark search, and do I need it?

In order to minimize expenses, solopreneurs often avoid hiring a trademark attorney to conduct a trademark availability search. Often relying on their own internet searches to vet the brand selected. Businesses that follow this process forgo the trademark availability search, which includes the federal trademark registry and each state trademark registry as well. A properly conducted trademark availability search will look for active trademarks and cancelled or abandoned marks. Additionally, the trademark availability search offers a limited search of the web for use of same and/or similar marks and a search of not only identical but phonetically equivalent marks. Its highly recommend that all businesses conduct a trademark availability search before proceeding with the filing of a trademark application.

Is the use of a trademark in commerce required for registration?

Under U.S. law, the actual use of a mark in commerce creates rights and priority over others. The rule for “ownership” of a mark starts with the “first to use”, not the “first to file”. Thus, if a trademark availability search was performed and it showed that the mark may be available, we recommend that you immediately start using the trademark to secure your priority of ownership over potential claimants.

Why is it essential to have an attorney assist in protecting your trademark in the U.S.?

Trademark disputes can occur during both the registration and enforcement periods. Our intellectual property lawyer will perform a comprehensive search to make sure the trademark you want to register is unique and won’t cause any dispute. We will clearly identify the goods and/or services to be associated with the mark and help you avoid registration errors and rejections that only lead to delays and added expenses.

What are the advantages of registering a trademark in the U.S.?

  • A legal presumption of your ownership of the mark and your exclusive right to use the mark nationwide on or in connection with the goods/services listed in the registration (whereas a state registration only provides rights within the borders of that one state, and common law rights exist only for the specific area where the mark is used);
  • Public notice of your claim of ownership of the mark;
  • Listing in the USPTO’s online databases;
  • The ability to record the U.S. registration with U.S. Customs and Border Protection to prevent importation of infringing foreign goods;
  • The right to use the federal registration symbol “®”;
  • The ability to bring an action concerning the mark in federal court; and
  • The use of the U.S. registration as a basis to obtain registration in foreign countries

Is my trademark protected worldwide when I register it in the U.S.?

No! While in the U.S. ownership is based on the “first to use” system, most foreign jurisdictions follow the “first to file” system – meaning that outside of the United States you are encouraged to file your registration for your trademark as quickly as possible. The “first to file” system has made it easier for some manufacturers or potential distributors to file for trademark protection in bad faith with the sole intent of holding them for ransom from the real trademark owners. Thus, if you are or intend to expand operations such as manufacturing or commercializing your brand overseas, we highly recommended to preemptively file for trademark protection in those jurisdictions before proceeding with any initial contact or negotiation for said manufacturing or commercialization

What is the correct use of the ®, TM, and SM denominations?

  • ® Registered mark symbol is a federal registration symbol reserved for registered marks, not pending, with the United States Patent and Trademark Office. Should be noted that it’s prohibited to use the ® before the actual certificate of registration is actually issued by United States Patent and Trademark Office.
    TM and SM are reserved for use by unregistered marks.
  • TM: is intended to be used on unregistered marks that identify PRODUCTS such as sodas, cereals, produce, and canned products.
  • SM: is intended to be used on unregistered marks that identify SERVICES such as those of restaurants, hotels, travel agencies, and import/export agencies, etc.

What is a Recordation with U.S. Customs and Border Protection?

What is a CBP Recordation?

Many companies mistakenly believe that registering a trademark or copyright with the U.S. Government provides the same protection and remedies as recording those materials with U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP). The processes achieve two different goals. The reason to register a trademark or copyright with the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) is to give the public notice of one’s ownership of the trademark or copyright. On the other hand, the purpose of recording a trademark or copyright with U.S. Customs is to partner with U.S. Customs to prevent the unauthorized importation of merchandise which bears a recorded trademark or copyright. U.S. Customs prevents counterfeit products from entering or exiting the United States (and included in transit goods) when registered trademark or copyright holders record their trademarks or copyrights with U.S. Customs.

Does CBP Take Recordations Seriously?

CBP takes Intellectual Property Rights (IPR) enforcement very seriously, in fact, it’s a priority. Shipments not destined for the U.S., that are merely in transit (for example from China for a brief stop in Miami to the ultimate destination in Latin America), are no exception. The fact that CBP enforces IPR rights for in transit merchandise surprises many — but lets face it, if CBP is to protect IPR rights, why should it stop at products solely destined for the U.S.?

When a trademark or copyright is recorded with U.S. Customs, infringing merchandise may easily be detected by U.S. Customs at all 328 official ports of entry across the country. Once a trademark or copyright is recorded with U.S. Customs, the owner’s information is entered into an electronic database accessible to over 60,000 U.S. Customs officers in the United States and overseas. U.S. Customs uses this information to target suspect shipments for the purpose of physically examining merchandise which ultimately prevents the importation or exportation of infringing goods. To make sure a trademark or copyright is properly recorded with U.S. Customs, consult with Diaz Trade Law. Diaz Trade Law is familiar with the process and familiar with teaching CBP how to look out for infringers.

What are the Advantages to Recording a Trademark or Copyright?

The most obvious advantage to recording a trademark or copyright with U.S. Customs, is that U.S. Customs will monitor and seize infringing merchandise at the ports of entry so that the trademark or copyright holder does not have to locate and prosecute every unauthorized importer, distributor, retailer illegally using its trademark or copyright.

U.S. Customs has the authority to issue monetary fines against anyone who facilitates the attempted introduction into the U.S. of seized and forfeited counterfeit merchandise. U.S. Customs may go to the U.S. Attorney’s Office and request that those involved in the illegal activity be criminally prosecuted under the Trademark Counterfeiting Act of 1984. First time violators of this Act are subject to penalties of up to ten years imprisonment and/or a $2,000,000 fine, while repeat offenders are subject to 20 years imprisonment and/or a fine up to $5,000,000.

Is it an Easy Process?

Trademark and copyright recordations may now be filed online with U.S. Customs’ new Intellectual Property Rights e-Recordation (IPRR) online system. CBP’s IPRR system allows holders of registered trademarks and copyrights to record their registration with CBP, so that CBP can police the borders for infringing goods. Once recorded, it is entered into an online search system named IPRS. CBP officers can be trained to identify and interdict counterfeit goods. Before logging on to record a trademark or copyright, a trademark or copyright holder should be extremely knowledgeable with the Customs regulations found in 19 CFR Part 133, and the specific questions that will be asked on the application. Otherwise, consult with Diaz Trade Law. Diaz Trade Law is already familiar with the process.

What are Grey Market Goods?

It is advisable to attempt to obtain “gray market” protection from U.S. Customs. “Gray market” goods are foreign-made articles bearing a genuine trademark or trade name identical with, or substantially indistinguishable from one owned and recorded by a citizen of the United States or a corporation or association created or organized within the United States, which are imported without the authorization of the U.S. holder.

What is the Benefit to my Company?

If you took the time to register your trademark or copyright with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office then consider taking the extra step to record that trademark or copyright with CBP. Wouldn’t you want CBP to stop infringers, even if they are just passing through for a brief moment?

It is extremely beneficial for a company to record its registered trademark or copyright with U.S. Customs, as U.S. Customs may be a company’s greatest, and most cost effective ally when it comes to trademark and copyright enforcement.

Want More Information?
See relevant blog posts here:
https://diaztradelaw.com/intellectual-property-rights-are-high-priority-for-cbp/
https://diaztradelaw.com/u-s-customs-border-protection-seized-my-goods-oh-no/
https://diaztradelaw.com/importing-into-the-united-states-in-compliance-with-u-s-customs-border-protection-cbp/
https://diaztradelaw.com/china-sourcing-fair-how-to-solve-u-s-customs-issues-when-importing-from-china-2/

Why is Recording a Trademark with U.S. Customs and Border Protection Essential?

  • CBP recognizes the importance of intellectual property protection and provides assistance in stopping the infringing products at our borders.  CBP’s Intellectual Property Rights Recordation (“IPRR”) system allows holders of registered trademarks and copyrights to record their registration with CBP, so that CBP can police the borders for infringing goods.  Once recorded, it is entered into an online search system named IPRS.
  • Considering the incentives for counterfeiters along with the potential losses for intellectual property rights holders, companies that import merchandise must consider recordation a necessity. Importantly, when you record your marks, you must go to an expert in this area – as this is your opportunity to train CBP on the methods of policing your mark – and only trained experts can work on this proficiently, so you have the best results with CBP, like Hermes did. To learn more about the top four benefits of recording your intellectual property, review this article.

Copyright

What is a copyright?

  • Copyright protection exists for original “works of authorship” fixed in any tangible medium of expression, now known or later developed, from which they can be perceived, reproduced, or otherwise communicated, either directly or with the aid of a machine or device.
  • Works of authorship include the following categories:
    • literary works;
    • musical works, including any accompanying words;
    • dramatic works, including any accompanying music;
    • pantomimes and choreographic works;
    • pictorial, graphic, and sculptural works;
    • motion pictures and other audiovisual works;
    • sound recordings; and
    • architectural works.

Do you need a copyright registration in order to file a lawsuit?

  • Yes. A recent Supreme Court decision, Fourth Estate Public Benefit Corp. v. Wall-Street.com LLC et al. held “registration occurs, and a copyright claimant may commence an infringement suit, when the Copyright Office registers a copyright. Upon registration of the copyright, however, a copyright owner can recover for infringement that occurred both before and after registration”.
  • There are ways to expedite the registration process where the certificate is received in 7-15 days by paying an additional government filing fees. Please be advised that this expedited procedure is reserved for emergencies, for example, where you must file a lawsuit related to the work in question.

What does a copyright NOT protect?

Copyright does not protect facts, ideas, systems, or methods of operation, although it may protect the way these things are expressed. Copyright protection isn’t available until the work is in a tangible medium of expression, such as a paperback book or audio recording. Your work is under copyright protection the moment it is created and fixed in a tangible form that it is perceptible either directly or with the aid of a machine or device.

Why should I obtain copyright protection?

Once obtained, a copyright gives you exclusive rights to your artistic works. These include the right to:

  • to reproduce the copyrighted work in copies or phonorecords;
  • to prepare derivative works based upon the copyrighted work;
  • to distribute copies or phonorecords of the copyrighted work to the public by sale or other transfer of ownership, or by rental, lease, or lending;
  • in the case of literary, musical, dramatic, and choreographic works, pantomimes, and motion pictures and other audiovisual works, to perform the copyrighted work publicly
  • in the case of literary, musical, dramatic, and choreographic works, pantomimes, and pictorial, graphic, or sculptural works, including the individual images of a motion picture or other audiovisual work, to display the copyrighted work publicly; and
  • in the case of sound recordings, to perform the copyrighted work publicly by means of a digital audio transmission.

How long does a copyright last?

The length of the copyright protection varies depending on the date of first publication or creation. According to the U.S. Copyright Office, all registered works created after January 1, 1978 are protected all throughout the author’s lifetime plus an additional 70 years. If the copyright was created as a work for hire for a company or any other legal entity, the work has copyright protection that lasts for 95 years from the date it was first published or a term of 120 years from the year it was created, whichever expires first.

Why is it essential to have an attorney assist in protecting your copyright in the U.S.?

Copyright disputes can occur during both the registration and enforcement periods. We will clearly identify the best type of protection for your work and help you avoid registration errors and rejections that only lead to delays and added expenses. We’ll help make sure you file a copyright application in a timely manner to ensure you neither lose any of your rights nor face intellectual property disputes in the future.

What is a Recordation with U.S. Customs and Border Protection?

What is a CBP Recordation?

Many companies mistakenly believe that registering a trademark or copyright with the U.S. Government provides the same protection and remedies as recording those materials with U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP). The processes achieve two different goals. The reason to register a trademark or copyright with the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) is to give the public notice of one’s ownership of the trademark or copyright. On the other hand, the purpose of recording a trademark or copyright with U.S. Customs is to partner with U.S. Customs to prevent the unauthorized importation of merchandise which bears a recorded trademark or copyright. U.S. Customs prevents counterfeit products from entering or exiting the United States (and included in transit goods) when registered trademark or copyright holders record their trademarks or copyrights with U.S. Customs.

Does CBP Take Recordations Seriously?

CBP takes Intellectual Property Rights (IPR) enforcement very seriously, in fact, it’s a priority. Shipments not destined for the U.S., that are merely in transit (for example from China for a brief stop in Miami to the ultimate destination in Latin America), are no exception. The fact that CBP enforces IPR rights for in transit merchandise surprises many — but lets face it, if CBP is to protect IPR rights, why should it stop at products solely destined for the U.S.?

When a trademark or copyright is recorded with U.S. Customs, infringing merchandise may easily be detected by U.S. Customs at all 328 official ports of entry across the country. Once a trademark or copyright is recorded with U.S. Customs, the owner’s information is entered into an electronic database accessible to over 60,000 U.S. Customs officers in the United States and overseas. U.S. Customs uses this information to target suspect shipments for the purpose of physically examining merchandise which ultimately prevents the importation or exportation of infringing goods. To make sure a trademark or copyright is properly recorded with U.S. Customs, consult with Diaz Trade Law. Diaz Trade Law is familiar with the process and familiar with teaching CBP how to look out for infringers.

What are the Advantages to Recording a Trademark or Copyright?

The most obvious advantage to recording a trademark or copyright with U.S. Customs, is that U.S. Customs will monitor and seize infringing merchandise at the ports of entry so that the trademark or copyright holder does not have to locate and prosecute every unauthorized importer, distributor, retailer illegally using its trademark or copyright.

U.S. Customs has the authority to issue monetary fines against anyone who facilitates the attempted introduction into the U.S. of seized and forfeited counterfeit merchandise. U.S. Customs may go to the U.S. Attorney’s Office and request that those involved in the illegal activity be criminally prosecuted under the Trademark Counterfeiting Act of 1984. First time violators of this Act are subject to penalties of up to ten years imprisonment and/or a $2,000,000 fine, while repeat offenders are subject to 20 years imprisonment and/or a fine up to $5,000,000.

Is it an Easy Process?

Trademark and copyright recordations may now be filed online with U.S. Customs’ new Intellectual Property Rights e-Recordation (IPRR) online system. CBP’s IPRR system allows holders of registered trademarks and copyrights to record their registration with CBP, so that CBP can police the borders for infringing goods. Once recorded, it is entered into an online search system named IPRS. CBP officers can be trained to identify and interdict counterfeit goods. Before logging on to record a trademark or copyright, a trademark or copyright holder should be extremely knowledgeable with the Customs regulations found in 19 CFR Part 133, and the specific questions that will be asked on the application. Otherwise, consult with Diaz Trade Law. Diaz Trade Law is already familiar with the process.

What are Grey Market Goods?

It is advisable to attempt to obtain “gray market” protection from U.S. Customs. “Gray market” goods are foreign-made articles bearing a genuine trademark or trade name identical with, or substantially indistinguishable from one owned and recorded by a citizen of the United States or a corporation or association created or organized within the United States, which are imported without the authorization of the U.S. holder.

What is the Benefit to my Company?

If you took the time to register your trademark or copyright with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office then consider taking the extra step to record that trademark or copyright with CBP. Wouldn’t you want CBP to stop infringers, even if they are just passing through for a brief moment?

It is extremely beneficial for a company to record its registered trademark or copyright with U.S. Customs, as U.S. Customs may be a company’s greatest, and most cost effective ally when it comes to trademark and copyright enforcement.

Want More Information?
See relevant blog posts here:
https://diaztradelaw.com/intellectual-property-rights-are-high-priority-for-cbp/
https://diaztradelaw.com/u-s-customs-border-protection-seized-my-goods-oh-no/
https://diaztradelaw.com/importing-into-the-united-states-in-compliance-with-u-s-customs-border-protection-cbp/
https://diaztradelaw.com/china-sourcing-fair-how-to-solve-u-s-customs-issues-when-importing-from-china-2/

Why is Recording a copyright with U.S. Customs and Border Protection Essential?

  • CBP recognizes the importance of intellectual property protection and provides assistance in stopping the infringing products at our borders.  CBP’s Intellectual Property Rights Recordation (“IPRR”) system allows holders of registered trademarks and copyrights to record their registration with CBP, so that CBP can police the borders for infringing goods.  Once recorded, it is entered into an online search system named IPRS.
  • Considering the incentives for counterfeiters along with the potential losses for intellectual property rights holders, companies that import merchandise must consider recordation a necessity. Importantly, when you record your marks, you must go to an expert in this area – as this is your opportunity to train CBP on the methods of policing your mark – and only trained experts can work on this proficiently, so you have the best results with CBP, like Hermes did. To learn more about the top four benefits of recording your intellectual property, review this article.

Enforcement

What can do you if another company is using your intellectual property rights?

Before embarking in the costly legal process of filing a trademark or copyright infringement lawsuit, sending a cease and desist notice to infringers informing them of your intellectual property rights and demanding they stop infringing on your rights could potentially resolve this issue, without the need for litigation. During this preliminary step our attorneys will conduct preliminary research, draft and send this cease and desist notice to the infringer. However, if required our attorneys are ready to pursue legal action against trademark or copyright infringers and other intellectual property issues in state and Federal Courts.

CBP Recordations

What is a Recordation with U.S. Customs and Border Protection?

What is a CBP Recordation?

Many companies mistakenly believe that registering a trademark or copyright with the U.S. Government provides the same protection and remedies as recording those materials with U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP). The processes achieve two different goals. The reason to register a trademark or copyright with the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) is to give the public notice of one’s ownership of the trademark or copyright. On the other hand, the purpose of recording a trademark or copyright with U.S. Customs is to partner with U.S. Customs to prevent the unauthorized importation of merchandise which bears a recorded trademark or copyright. U.S. Customs prevents counterfeit products from entering or exiting the United States (and included in transit goods) when registered trademark or copyright holders record their trademarks or copyrights with U.S. Customs.

Does CBP Take Recordations Seriously?

CBP takes Intellectual Property Rights (IPR) enforcement very seriously, in fact, it’s a priority. Shipments not destined for the U.S., that are merely in transit (for example from China for a brief stop in Miami to the ultimate destination in Latin America), are no exception. The fact that CBP enforces IPR rights for in transit merchandise surprises many — but lets face it, if CBP is to protect IPR rights, why should it stop at products solely destined for the U.S.?

When a trademark or copyright is recorded with U.S. Customs, infringing merchandise may easily be detected by U.S. Customs at all 328 official ports of entry across the country. Once a trademark or copyright is recorded with U.S. Customs, the owner’s information is entered into an electronic database accessible to over 60,000 U.S. Customs officers in the United States and overseas. U.S. Customs uses this information to target suspect shipments for the purpose of physically examining merchandise which ultimately prevents the importation or exportation of infringing goods. To make sure a trademark or copyright is properly recorded with U.S. Customs, consult with Diaz Trade Law. Diaz Trade Law is familiar with the process and familiar with teaching CBP how to look out for infringers.

What are the Advantages to Recording a Trademark or Copyright?

The most obvious advantage to recording a trademark or copyright with U.S. Customs, is that U.S. Customs will monitor and seize infringing merchandise at the ports of entry so that the trademark or copyright holder does not have to locate and prosecute every unauthorized importer, distributor, retailer illegally using its trademark or copyright.

U.S. Customs has the authority to issue monetary fines against anyone who facilitates the attempted introduction into the U.S. of seized and forfeited counterfeit merchandise. U.S. Customs may go to the U.S. Attorney’s Office and request that those involved in the illegal activity be criminally prosecuted under the Trademark Counterfeiting Act of 1984. First time violators of this Act are subject to penalties of up to ten years imprisonment and/or a $2,000,000 fine, while repeat offenders are subject to 20 years imprisonment and/or a fine up to $5,000,000.

Is it an Easy Process?

Trademark and copyright recordations may now be filed online with U.S. Customs’ new Intellectual Property Rights e-Recordation (IPRR) online system. CBP’s IPRR system allows holders of registered trademarks and copyrights to record their registration with CBP, so that CBP can police the borders for infringing goods. Once recorded, it is entered into an online search system named IPRS. CBP officers can be trained to identify and interdict counterfeit goods. Before logging on to record a trademark or copyright, a trademark or copyright holder should be extremely knowledgeable with the Customs regulations found in 19 CFR Part 133, and the specific questions that will be asked on the application. Otherwise, consult with Diaz Trade Law. Diaz Trade Law is already familiar with the process.

What are Grey Market Goods?

It is advisable to attempt to obtain “gray market” protection from U.S. Customs. “Gray market” goods are foreign-made articles bearing a genuine trademark or trade name identical with, or substantially indistinguishable from one owned and recorded by a citizen of the United States or a corporation or association created or organized within the United States, which are imported without the authorization of the U.S. holder.

What is the Benefit to my Company?

If you took the time to register your trademark or copyright with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office then consider taking the extra step to record that trademark or copyright with CBP. Wouldn’t you want CBP to stop infringers, even if they are just passing through for a brief moment?

It is extremely beneficial for a company to record its registered trademark or copyright with U.S. Customs, as U.S. Customs may be a company’s greatest, and most cost effective ally when it comes to trademark and copyright enforcement.

Want More Information?
See relevant blog posts here:
https://diaztradelaw.com/intellectual-property-rights-are-high-priority-for-cbp/
https://diaztradelaw.com/u-s-customs-border-protection-seized-my-goods-oh-no/
https://diaztradelaw.com/importing-into-the-united-states-in-compliance-with-u-s-customs-border-protection-cbp/
https://diaztradelaw.com/china-sourcing-fair-how-to-solve-u-s-customs-issues-when-importing-from-china-2/

CBP Intellectual Property Penalties

Did you receive a Notice that looks like this from CBP?

(If so, we can help. See below)
8

What Does This Notice Mean?

Another benefit to U.S. trademark owners that record their trademark with U.S. Customs is that U.S. Customs has the authority to issue monetary fines against anyone who facilitates the attempted introduction into the U.S. of seized and forfeited counterfeit merchandise. It is the anti-counterfeiting consumer protection act which provides authority for U.S. Customs to impose civil fines pursuant to 19 U.S.C. § 1526(F), in addition to the seizure and forfeiture of imported merchandise bearing counterfeit marks. The parties subject to monetary fines are any person who “directs, assists financially or otherwise, or aids and abets the importation of merchandise.”

U.S. Customs publishes a guidance document entitled “What Every Member of the Trade Community Should Know About: Mitigation Guidelines: Fines, Penalties, Forfeitures and Liquidated Damages.” The relevant portion of the guidance document discussing U.S. Customs authority to issue a fine in various situations is copied below:
http://www.cbp.gov/sites/default/files/documents/icp069_3.pdf
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How Can Diaz Trade Law Help?

If you receive a monetary fine from U.S. Customs, contact Diaz Trade Law today. We have helped numerous companies successfully mitigate penalties from CBP for underlying seizures of alleged counterfeit merchandise.

*Successful Past Results:

Successfully mitigated penalties from CBP for an underlying intellectual property rights violation. Some REAL examples include:

  • Successfully Mitigated a $4,147,823.00 penalty down to $4,000.00.
  • Successfully Mitigated a $395,225.00 penalty down to $37,320.00.
  • Successfully Mitigated a $297,000.00 penalty down to $0.
  • Successfully Mitigated a $206,160 penalty down to $20,616.90.
  • Successfully Mitigated a $146,976.00 penalty down to $0.
  • Successfully Mitigated a $136,037.00 penalty down to $13,603.70.
  • Successfully Mitigated a $100,170.00 penalty down to $0.
  • Successfully Mitigated a $65,000 penalty down to $6,500.
  • Successfully Mitigated a $76,274.00 penalty down to $15,255.00.
  • Successfully Mitigated a $39,000.00 penalty down to $3,900.00.

CONTACT DIAZ TRADE LAW

 

Call 305-456-3830

Note: If you have documents you would like us to review, please email docs@DiazTradeLaw.com

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